New Pet Rabbit Supplies Kit

Rabbit Care Guide - 5 Fundamentals ~ New Rabbit Checklist ~ New Pet Rabbit Supplies Kit

New Pet Rabbit Supplies Kit

Everything you need for happy healthy rabbits, is right here!

Just Rabbits has put together some essential packs, kits and bundles of products that we recommend, to not only get you started on your rabbit ownership life, but also keep you going.

The First Step to Happy Healthy Rabbits

By starting with the 'New Pet Rabbit Supplies Kit', you can then move on through the bundles during the life time of your rabbit.

Just create an account at the checkout area when you go to pay and we will remind you when the next supplies bundle is ready for ordering.

We have done all the hard work for you, by choosing and grouping the very best products together, you can relax in the knowledge that your rabbits will be getting the best fundamental elements in all round care.

Why is a New Rabbit Supplies Kit a Good Idea?!

The reasons are many, but here's just a few that I can think of straight away... buying your essential supplies here will...

  • Saves time - Going to your local pet shop, sitting in traffic and queuing at the til, all take up your valuable time. By ordering online you can say goodbye to all of that!
  • Saves petrol and traveling costs - The cost of petrol means that any standard journey adds pounds, yes pounds, to your overall spend when you go shopping. That's why so many leading supermarkets are offering delivery services now. Just Rabbits are doing the same but...
  • Our delivery is FREE - Yep, that's right, FREE. You can do what you like with the money you save here! (I recommend an expensive bottle of wine and a large bar of fruit and nut, but that's just me :-)
  • Protects your precious bones - Say goodbye to heavy lifting of litter sacks and rabbit pellets in car parks that leave you needing a back massage or chiropractic help! 
  • Peace of mind - You are getting the best value for money for top quality supplies so you can take comfort knowing your bunnies will be healthy and happy for a long time to come.

Can't say fairer than that can we!?

Create an Account at the Checkout

Choose from a range of mixed packs and kits that include rabbit equipment basics, rabbit diet provisions, rabbit health care essentials, pet rabbit hygiene equipment and lots of important rabbit care advice, information, guides and instruction where necessary.

Shop Now

Additional Help

The New Pet Rabbit Supplies Kit is superb but sometimes new rabbit owners need a little extra help, so Just Rabbits has put together A New Rabbit Checklist which is perfect if you are:

  1. thinking about getting a pet rabbit,
  2. or if you have just bought one,
  3. or even if you are thinking about a rescue rabbit (good on you!).

If you have already got your rabbit home, you could be wondering,

"What on earth do I do now!?
This is just not as simple as I thought it would be".

This New Rabbit Checklist should help with the basics...

New Rabbit Checklist

Pre-check check list:

Read up your rabbit facts


Check the rabbit care guide,

If you are still convinced you want pet rabbits, read on...

Here's a very brief new rabbit checklist of things you must have and know before considering or getting a pet rabbit.

Note: This New Rabbit Checklist
is not in any particular order of importance
as they are ALL equally important!

1. Diet

Rabbits Love Fresh Greens & Veggies
Leafy greens: Romaine, kale, collard greens, beet tops, mustard greens, carrot tops
Herbs: mint, parsley, cilantro, basil, sorrel, etc.
Veggies: carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, etc.
NEVER feed: corn, peas, beans, potatoes, rhubarb greens, onions or garlic.

Rabbits Love Greens

Rabbits love fresh greens.

Timothy Hay

Grass Hay
This is probably the most important, especially if you intend to keep indoor rabbits or outdoor rabbits that don't have access to a lawn etc.

Rabbits need a continuous supply of hay, at all times. Use any grass hay, such as Timothy, Orchard, Brome, Oat or mixed grasses.

Avoid the cheap hay that is short and very dusty as these types of hay can cause respiratory problems.

Alfalfa hay can be given as an occasional treat or for very young rabbits as alfalfa hay is very rich and can make rabbits overweight.

Best rabbit food

Food Pellets
Vets believe that high fibre is most important when recommending a rabbit food. Wild rabbits mainly eat grass, which naturally contains 20-25% fibre and rabbits’ digestive systems have evolved to need a high fibre diet.

An adult rabbit should have a pellet food with a fibre content of at least 18-20% and a protein content of around 12-14%.

Young rabbits need a higher protein level of around 16% as they are still developing.

They should also have plain pellets, without mixed in additions, such as muesli or grains.

When you are shopping for rabbit food, just take a look at the ingredients on the side of the box or bag. The proportions of each ingredient should look a little like this:

Rabbit Pellet Food Label

Always look at the labels.
This rabbit food has excellent fibre content at 28%

Not all rabbit food is the same...

Food Warning - Rabbit Muesli

Muesli is a type of commercial rabbit food that contains a number of different components such as flaked maize, peas, pellets, grains and seeds.

Recent research has shown that including muesli-style foods in a rabbits diet can lead to teeth and stomach problems.

A new study detailed from RAW (rabbit awareness week) has confirmed what many vets and rabbit experts have long suspected - that muesli-style foods are not good for a rabbits' health.

Muesli style rabbit food may be cheap to buy and cheerful to look at but the reality is that mixed muesli may cost you thousands in vet bills for digestion and teeth problems caused by the lack of nutrition.

Rabbit News Headlines

The fibre content of muesli type rabbit foods is usually very low, the fat content is high and the vitamins and minerals needed to sustain a healthy rabbit, are mostly non-existent.

But it's OK because here's a selection of recommended high fibre, low fat rabbit pellets:

Food and diet is a crucial factor in your rabbit's health. So many rabbits die because of this one aspect alone.

For this reason, I have dedicated a very in depth page about a rabbit's diet here, with safe and unsafe food lists, the importance of hay and water and it even covers what foods are safe to give as treats and rewards.

2. Accommodation

Rabbit Hutches & Cages - Their Home is Sanctuary
I personally don't think any rabbit should be kept in a hutch or a cage as it's just not natural and there are alternatives available, however, I will reluctantly outline a few important points about hutches and cages for those that really have no alternative option - although there is always another way!

A cage or hutch should be tall enough for your rabbit to stretch up without his ears touching the top. Long/wide enough that your rabbit can stretch out fully in any direction with some room to spare. A door that opens outward so that the rabbit can hop in and out on his own. Roomy enough to have space for a litter-box, a food dish and water supply. The larger the better, especially if your rabbit will spend many hours a day in his hutch or cage.

A Hutch is Not Enough

Hutches and cages should only be used for short periods of time and for these possible reasons:

  • Sleeping
  • Transporting
  • Having Babies
  • Eating
  • Drinking
  • Shade
  • Protection

And not for:

  • Permanent Living
  • The Sole Exercise Area
  • Too Many Rabbits
  • Mixed Species of Animals

3. Resting & Sleeping

Resting Surface
Your rabbit's living area should include a solid surface for resting. If the cage you have has an all-wire bottom, you can provide a solid surface by inserting a carpet sample, folded newspaper, cardboard, etc.

(My rabbits just love resting on concrete slabs in the shade during the summer months and are very partial to a piece of carpet in the winter - or my best slippers!)

Pampered Luxury Bunny Bed

More on the 40 Winks Luxury Swirl Mattress

Comfortable Bed
Believe it or not rabbits can be very particular about their bed and if you've seen a pregnant rabbit preparing her 'nest' then you'll see just how much trouble they go to to make it very comfortable indeed.

It's always a bonus having toilet/litter box trained rabbits, as you can go to town on their bedding and sleeping baskets.

My buns love a squidgy fluffy mat and they even 'groom' it to keep it clean! I've put a padded mattress underneath too for extra comfort and it's their favourite place to be come bed time.

4. Hygiene

How to litter box train your rabbit

Litter Boxes
Have at least two - one for inside the cage or living area; the other for the exercise area. They should be big enough for your rabbit and a portion of hay to be in the box together comfortably.

A deep (4"+) or high sided litter box is recommended to prevent accidents. The deep ones used for cats are ideal but remember if you have two rabbits it needs to be big enough accommodate them both, as they sometimes like to do their business at the same time.

This is the material used inside the litter box to soak up urine. This should preferably be an organic or paper-based litter. Avoid clumping litter and soft-wood shavings (cedar/pine) as it can cause serious health problems if just breathed in.

If your rabbit decides to eat his litter, then additional precautions are necessary to prevent digestive problems.

5. Dishes & Bowls

Best Pet Rabbit Feeding Bowls

Food Dish
Preferably a heavy, ceramic crock or plastic dish that can be secured to the cage.

If you have a pair of rabbits, which you should, be sure to get a bowl large enough so both rabbits can fit their heads in at the same time, or two bowls, to prevent disagreements.

6. Water Supply

Daily Clean Fresh Water
You can use either a bottle or a dish similar to food dish. Most rabbits require at least a 16 oz. bottle and bigger is usually better.

You'll be surprised at how much water a rabbit drinks during the course of the day.

7. Carrying & Transportation

Car Seat Small Pet Rabbit Carrier

More on the Options Car Seat Pet Carrier

This is a very important as you'll need it a lot in the first few months as you safely transport your rabbit home, to/from the vet and even to evacuate in case of emergency... (which you may just have to do if the little bundle of joy eats your washing machine cables and it sets alight the next time you turn on, sending you off to a friends place while the Fire department sorts it all out! Yes that happened to me - and a few weeks later my Internet cables got munched; another move while the engineer re-installed my life! Gotta love 'em!)

Look for a carrier that disassembles easily and/or has a top opening in order to remove an unwilling rabbit with the least amount of trauma. I always put something from home in it with them as the familiar smell seems to keep them calm.

My carrier is excellent and the 5 hour car journey to my Mum's house was a brilliant test. Both my rabbits were very comfortable in it for the whole journey and unbelievably held their bladders until we arrived. (Rabbits really don't like weeing where they are sitting! Mind you, neither would I ;-)

8. Grooming

Trimming a Rabbit's Nails

Nail Trimmers (especially if kept indoors)
This is important as indoor rabbits can't keep their nails trimmed themselves. They just don't dig and scratch and wear them down as much as outdoor rabbits. For most rabbits, scissor style is easiest to use. For dwarf rabbits, you can use human nail trimmers.

Be careful you understand where the 'quick' of the nail is. (Believe it or not my rabbits have never been hurt during nail cutting time, but the first time I cut my baby son's nails, I made him bleed - what kind of Mother am I?!)

Brushes & Combs
Use a soft bristle slicker brush to help remove more fur after brushing with a soft bristle brush. The brushes with thick rubber bristles that attract hair like a magnet are good as they don't pull, yank or scratch and are gentle on a rabbit's sensitive skin. They loosen hair easily and are said to stimulate natural oils in the rabbit's coat.

The metal slicker brushes are not recommended on rabbits as they are quite penetrating and can harm your rabbit's flesh.

The type of comb with two sets of teeth are best especially for long haired rabbits or rabbits that are prone to matting.

9. Toys & Games

Fun Rabbit Toys

Toys &  Chew Toys
Your New Pet Rabbit Supplies Kit should not be without toys and the Intermediate bundle has the ideal toy that rabbits just love!

Sign up at the checkout to get your Intermediate Bundle after you purchase your New Pet Rabbit Supplies Kit - Starter Bundle.

Toss toys, noisemakers and hiding spaces are excellent for keeping your rabbits amused.

The more toys your rabbit has, the less likely he is to use his natural instincts to dig/chew on inappropriate items like furniture, cables, plants, trees etc.

However, toys are not an alternative to bunny-proofing your home, for your rabbit's safety as well as your own, nor are they an alternative to other rabbit companions, which are so important to all rabbits.

10. Appropriate Guide & Reference or Care Book

While the Internet is a great source of information, guide and reference books are vital part of the new pet rabbit supplies kit and an editor's 'Top Pick' will be included in the Supplies Kit.

However, there are many different books available and the best advice here is to choose one that can be quickly referred to, especially in case of an emergency.

If funding allows, it is recommended you also get a breed specific book as the advice will be centered on your pet rabbit situation.

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If you feel this New pet Rabbit Supplies Kit Information page has been helpful, please let me know.

If you think it can be improved, let me know that too.

I'm grateful for all feedback, from rabbit owners, new rabbit owners and even yet-to-be rabbit owners! 

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The Surprising 7 Fundamentals of Rabbit Health

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